Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘CentCom’ Category

by Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

FORT DRUM, N.Y. (Feb. 9, 2009) – The top U.S. military officer said Monday he doesn’t expect the United States to deploy more than about 30,000 additional troops to Afghanistan, emphasizing the need for the State Department and other U.S. agencies to do their part as well.

U.S. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, addresses soldiers assigned to the 10th Mountain Division at Ft. Drum, N.Y., Feb. 9, 2009.

U.S. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, addresses soldiers assigned to the 10th Mountain Division at Ft. Drum, N.Y., Feb. 9, 2009.

Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told junior soldiers from the 10th Mountain Division that 2009 will be a pivotal year for Afghanistan that will require more than just military might. “It has gotten worse in Afghanistan,” he told the soldiers, some recently returned from Iraq and others expecting to deploy to Afghanistan next year. “Violence is up, [and] the Taliban is back.” In addition, he said, governance at the local, district, provincial and national levels “is not going well” and “has to be improved.”

“Getting that governance piece right as fast as we can is absolutely vital,” Mullen said, particularly with elections scheduled this summer. He noted that although the military inevitably will be involved, it’s not the agency best suited to assist with governance. The same, he said, holds true with helping Afghanistan improve economic development. “It is not possible to win this or succeed in Afghanistan militarily alone,” Mullen told the group.

So as the military expands the force in Afghanistan probably not much beyond the 20,000 to 30,000 numbers being discussed, Mullen said more nonmilitary enablers will be needed, too. “It has to be met with a commensurate surge from other agencies, particularly the State Department, in order for us to start generating success in 2009, which is a critical year,” he said.

Mullen praised the soldiers for the successes they helped to bring about in Iraq. “You have made a difference. You have turned it around in Iraq,” he said. Success wasn’t in sight 12 to 18 months ago, he said, but now it is.

In a separate session with family readiness group volunteers, he tied the success of the surge directly to the men and women on the ground. “It could not have been done without the 10th Mountain Division” and the rest of the U.S. military engaged there, he said. “I’ve been there a lot and seen the difference,” he told the spouses. “It gets a little bit better day by day, and we are very hopeful that we can continue to draw forces down in Iraq and that Iraqi people [will] continue to assume responsibility for their own country.”

But Mullen reminded the soldiers, “We are not done in Iraq.” Al-Qaida remains a problem, but is “greatly diminished,” he said. Governance is improving, as demonstrated by the successful late-January elections. Iraqi security forces are improving.

The 10th Mountain Division’s 3rd Brigade Combat Team was rerouted from Iraq to Afghanistan last fall. Its soldiers in Task Force Spartan are now deployed to eastern Afghanistan, taking up positions that until now had little coalition presence. “I expect there will be more of that over the next several months, although I don’t have the details of that,” Mullen told the troops. “That’s something the president decides.”

PHOTO: U.S. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, addresses soldiers assigned to the 10th Mountain Division at Ft. Drum, N.Y., Feb. 9.

Source: CENTCOM.

May you walk with the LORD always, and when you cannot take another step, may He carry you the rest of the way until you can walk along side Him again.

Cross-posted @ The Conservative Underground, SmartGirlPolitics and Rosemary’s Thoughts.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

by Gerry Gilmore
American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON (Jan. 29, 2009) – Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates is expected to present the Pentagon’s proposal for a U.S. troop increase in Afghanistan to President Barack Obama in the near future, Pentagon Press Secretary Geoff Morrell said Thursday. “I think everybody’s committed to doing this as quickly and responsibly as possible,” Morrell told Pentagon reporters. “In the coming days, the secretary hopes to present the president with his recommendation.”

Sgt. Brian Morris, a mortarman with 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (Reinforced), shovels dirt into dirt-filled protective barriers on a combat outpost during Operation Gateway III in the Farah province of Afghanistan Jan. 6, 2009. 3/8 is the ground combat element of Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force-Afghanistan.

Sgt. Brian Morris, a mortarman with 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (Reinforced), shovels dirt into dirt-filled protective barriers on a combat outpost during Operation Gateway III in the Farah province of Afghanistan Jan. 6, 2009. 3/8 is the ground combat element of Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force-Afghanistan.

Army Gen. David D. McKiernan, who commands U.S. forces in Afghanistan as well as NATO’s International Security Assistance Force, has asked his bosses for a 30,000-troop increase, which effectively would double the U.S. military contingent in Afghanistan.

Gates and other senior civilian and military officials at the Pentagon have said they believe it is necessary to send more troops to Afghanistan to suppress resurgent Taliban fighters and al-Qaida terrorists.

The White House is reviewing U.S. strategy in Iraq and Afghanistan, Morrell said. Any U.S. troop increase for Afghanistan, he said, needs the approval of the new commander in chief.

Increased violence in Afghanistan and Pakistan threatens global security and constitutes “the central front in our enduring struggle against terrorism,” Obama said during a Jan. 22 visit to the State Department. Obama also is studying several options presented to him by Pentagon officials for a drawdown of U.S. combat troops from Iraq.

During his Jan. 27 testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Gates said if Obama approves the Afghanistan troop increase, that most of those extra forces could be provided to McKiernan by midsummer.

Gates is mindful of the balancing of risk regarding U.S. troop strength in Iraq and Afghanistan, Morrell said, noting that the Iraq drawdown affects the numbers of additional troops available for deployment to Afghanistan. Additionally, any increase of combat troops for Afghanistan, Morrell said, would require additional support forces as well. “It’s a delicate plus-up, because you’ve got to do it commensurate to the infrastructure that exists” in austere Afghanistan, Morrell said.

Source: CENTCOM.

Cross-posted @ NCU Nation, SmartGirlPolitics and Rosemary’s Thoughts. Digg! Digg!

Read Full Post »

by John Valceanu
American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON (Feb. 1, 2009) – Senior military officials congratulated the Iraqi people for holding provincial elections yesterday, praising the Iraqi and U.S. forces that helped make the elections safe.

Two Iraqi Police officers display purple-stained fingers, signifying that they participated in Saturday's provincial elections.

Two Iraqi Police officers display purple-stained fingers, signifying that they participated in Saturday's provincial elections.

More than 14,400 candidates competed for 440 seats in 14 of 18 Iraqi provinces. Though five candidates were reported killed in the campaign leading up to the polls, there were no reports of deaths or major violence on the day of the elections.

Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of U.S. Central Command, issued a statement yesterday in which he applauded the work of everyone involved in the effort to have a successful election. “Congratulations to the Iraqi Government, the Iraqi Security Forces, the Iraqi people, the United Nations, the international observers, and Coalition elements for their concerted efforts in making today’s provincial elections an event of which all Iraqis should be proud and an effort the world should applaud,” Petraeus said.

The “elections are a cause for celebration as we salute the millions of Iraqi citizens who took to the streets to exercise their fundamental right to self-determination, said Petraeus, who commanded Multinational Force Iraq before assuming his current position.

“As we honor the courage and resolve of the Iraqi people who walked miles to a polling station and braved long lines and security concerns, I know that I can speak for all those who have been privileged to work with our Iraqi partners in the ‘Land of the Two Rivers’ in saying to the people of Iraq: ‘Mabruk,’” Petraeus said, using the Iraqi word for congratulations.

Army Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, current Multinational Force Iraq commander, also congratulated the Iraqis in a joint statement he issued with U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker. “The U.S. Embassy in Baghdad and the Multi-National Force – Iraq congratulate the Iraqi people on holding provincial elections today,” Odierno and Crocker said. “Voter turnout was large. Iraqi security forces successfully protected millions of Iraqis and enabled them to express their opinions freely in fourteen of Iraq’s governorates.”

Odierno and Crocker lauded the Iraqi government for their handling of the elections. “We congratulate the Iraqi authorities, their security forces and the Iraqi election commission for their careful preparation and administration of these elections,” Odierno and Crocker said.

The general and the ambassador also recognized the historic nature of this election. “These elections mark a significant milestone for the people of Iraq, and are a major step forward in Iraq’s democratic development,” they said.

Source: CENTCOM.

Cross-posted @ TCU Nation, SmartGirlPolitics and Rosemary’s Thoughts. Digg! Digg!

Read Full Post »

American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON (Jan. 16, 2009) – A new patrol in the U.S. Central Command is working to make it unprofitable to be a pirate, the commander of U.S. Navy Central Command and 5th Fleet said Jan. 15. Acts of piracy have “spiked” off the coast of Somalia with merchant vessels and crews being held for millions in ransom by pirates using AK-47 assault rifles, rocket-propelled grenades and ladders to take “low and slow” ships traversing one of the world’s busiest sea lanes.

Cpl. Cole Daniels, a military policeman assigned to Combat Logistics Battalion 26, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, train with a shotgun aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS San Antonio. San Antonio is the command ship for Combined Task Force 151. The task force conducts counter-piracy operations in and around the Gulf of Aden, Persian Sea, Indian Ocean and the Red Sea and was established to create a lawful maritime order and develop security in the maritime environment.

Cpl. Cole Daniels, a military policeman assigned to Combat Logistics Battalion 26, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, train with a shotgun aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS San Antonio. San Antonio is the command ship for Combined Task Force 151. The task force conducts counter-piracy operations in and around the Gulf of Aden, Persian Sea, Indian Ocean and the Red Sea and was established to create a lawful maritime order and develop security in the maritime environment.

The pirates come from a clan based on the northern coast of Somalia, Navy Vice Adm. William E. Gortney said, and they are in it for the money. “The problem of piracy started ashore,” the admiral said during a Pentagon news conference. “It’s because there is no rule of law. There isn’t a government. There isn’t economic stability. There isn’t a court system that will hold these criminals responsible for their actions.” Without a penalty for the Somalis, these clansmen — who are normally fishermen — took to piracy.

“As commander of the Combined Maritime Forces, I directed the establishment of the Maritime Security Patrol Area,” Gortney said. Coalition ships and aircraft patrol the area, but it is a complex operation, and task forces already in place had an existing counterterrorism mission. As a solution, Gortney established Combined Task Force 151 to conduct counter-piracy operations. Nations that are members of the task force “will bring their collective capabilities to bear to deter, to disrupt and eventually to bring to justice these maritime criminals,” he said.

The coalition group works with all concerned nations to deter the pirates and it has had some success. “I think, it’s really a fascinating story to watch unfold as, at this point, 14 nations have sent their navies to work against this destabilizing activity,” he said. This includes Russia and China, which are primarily escorting their own national flag vessels. “That allows us to go focus elsewhere with the rest of the ships that are down there,” Gortney said.

The efforts against piracy focused on three areas: bringing in more international forces, working with the shipping industry to put in place defenses to prevent pirates from successfully getting onboard their vessel, and finding a way to deal with the pirates legally. “When we capture a pirate, where do we take him? Where do we hold him? What court system tries him and holds him?” Gortney asked. [NOT GITMO! They’ll cry for him and then let him go!]

“When the activity spiked in the middle of August, we knew … our current process wasn’t working, and we had to take a new look at it,” the admiral said. And it is working. In the last six weeks there have been only four successful piracy attacks, the admiral said. “Dis-incentivizing piracy” is what Gortney calls the missing piece. “The State Department is close on finalizing an agreement with one of the nations out there,” he said. “And once we get that authority, then we’re going to change my orders.”

The orders to the coalition now are to disrupt and deter, but not capture, pirates. “But once we get the authorities, my orders will change to disrupt, deter and capture, and try and hold them accountable for their actions,” he said. “We have to make it unpleasant to be a pirate, and that’s where, when we can capture them and try them and hold them accountable for their actions,” he said.

Source: CENTCOM.

May you walk with the LORD always, and when you cannot take another step, may He carry you the rest of the way until you can walk along side Him again.

Cross-posted @ TCU Nation, SGP and Rosemary’s Thoughts. Digg! Digg!

Read Full Post »

by John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON (Jan. 12, 2009) – U.S. and Iraqi forces in Iraq’s Diyala province are preparing for rising violence amid upcoming provincial elections, an Army commander in Iraq said at a Pentagon news conference Monday. Army Col. Burt Thompson, commander of the 25th Infantry Division’s 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, said he anticipates an increase in violent activities as the Jan. 31 polling date nears. “It’s pretty clear what they’d be going after,” Thompson said, referring to potential election saboteurs. “It’s to sway the hearts and the minds, to intimidate those civilians from going and voting.”

An Iraqi soldier from the 2nd Battalion, 19th Brigade, 5th Division, pulls security at an abandoned school yard in Naqib. The Iraqi army is partnering with U.S. Forces to clear the villages of Naqib and Bey'a and disrupt al-Qaida networks and weapons caches in and around the Diyala province of Iraq, on Dec. 19.

An Iraqi soldier from the 2nd Battalion, 19th Brigade, 5th Division, pulls security at an abandoned school yard in Naqib. The Iraqi army is partnering with U.S. Forces to clear the villages of Naqib and Bey'a and disrupt al-Qaida networks and weapons caches in and around the Diyala province of Iraq, on Dec. 19.

Thompson, speaking via video teleconference from Forward Operating Base Warhorse, said Diyala province experiences about one “security incident” per week. A typical occurrence includes a bombing with homemade explosives targeting civilians in market areas. He identified members of al-Qaida and Jaysh al-Mahdi, the militant constituency of the Iranian-influenced Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr, as the main perpetrators of violence in the region.

To mitigate potential threats, Thompson said, Iraqi security forces have detailed plans for securing polling sites and the routes leading to and from them. “Al-Qaida, the enemy, the opponent, obviously, has a vote. And he will look for those critical vulnerabilities, if he can find them, and he’ll try to exploit those,” he said. “Our job is to prevent that from happening.”

Iraqi forces are culling “human intelligence” — word-of-mouth information from local people — to inform their preparations leading up to the elections. “The individuals that you talk to on the street are the greatest values, because quite frankly, most of the folks in Diyala province … want peace, they want stability, they want to move ahead, they want to get this behind them,” he said.

Thompson added that combined forces are emphasizing the security of ballots to ensure the accountability and responsibility of the process. Participants responsible for election security met for six hours yesterday ahead of a rehearsal planned for this week, Thompson said. Iraqi police will act as the “inner cordon” at voting sites and other sensitive locations, with Iraqi soldiers serving a support role as U.S. forces provide the “outer layer.”

The colonel characterized the upcoming vote as a moment of great historical and political significance for Iraq, marking the first real opportunity to seat a representative government at the provincial level.

“The 2005 election was to prove that, ‘I’ve got some ink on my finger, and we can actually do this election,’” he said, alluding to iconic images of Iraqis displaying ink-stained fingers indicating a ballot cast in national elections. But while the January 2005 voting represented the first general election since the 2003 invasion of Iraq, reports of widespread boycotting by Sunni Arabs called into question the vote’s legitimacy.

“The 2009 elections are a little bit different,” Thompson said. “This is an opportunity to seat governance, [which makes it] a critical period in the history of Iraq, certainly the history of Diyala, to move this place forward, to continue the growth, to continue the stability and prosperity that we’re starting to see now in Diyala province.”

Cross-posted @ TCU Nation, SmartGirlPolitics, and Rosemary’s Thoughts. Digg! Digg!

Read Full Post »

by Sgt. 1st Class Christina Bhatti
MND-B PAO

CAMP TAJI, Iraq, Jan. 8, 2009 – Some 300 girls in blue jumpers and white head scarves stood in formation on the school’s courtyard. The chill in the morning air rose in puffs as they chatted, happily anticipating the formal opening of their new school. “Today is a good day,” said Saeed Jassim Hameed al-Mashhadani, a tribal sheik in Tarmiyah, Iraq. “This day marks a beginning of education for these girls.”

The Huda Girls’ School in Tarmiyah, northwest of Baghdad, officially reopened its doors Jan. 5 in a ceremony that featured speeches, poems and songs. The school provides education to about 950 girls who attend classes at various times throughout the day.

About 300 girls stand in formation in the courtyard of the Huda Girls School in Tarmiyah, northwest of Baghdad, during the official reopening Jan. 5. The school was under renovation since 2006. A foiled terror plot set back the opening by almost a year.

About 300 girls stand in formation in the courtyard of the Huda Girls School in Tarmiyah, northwest of Baghdad, during the official reopening Jan. 5. The school was under renovation since 2006. A foiled terror plot set back the opening by almost a year.

Built in 1982, the building first was used as dormitory, but transformed into a school for agriculture in 1995. Since then, it has transformed again into primary and high schools specializing in the sciences. “This is really something big for the people. This is a fort of science,” Muhamad Ibrihim Jassim, administrative supervisor for the Ministry of Education in Tarmiyah, said about the school’s reopening. “This is the largest school in the area.”

The Ministry of Education had long recognized the school for its excellence. That was until 2003, when it became the scene of violence during major combat operations and slowly ceased to function, said Malcom Phelps, a senior education advisor for the coalition’s embedded provincial reconstruction team attached in Multinatioonal Division Baghdad to the 25th Infantry Division’s 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team.

The school, located near a joint security station, was the launching point of ambushes, homemade-bomb attacks and sniper fire against coalition forces and the then-nascent Iraqi security forces. After a cautious stability was reached in the area in 2006, soldiers from the 1st Cavalry Division began projects to rebuild the badly war-damaged school.

During the process, a major terror plan was thwarted. Soldiers discovered a command wire leading from the school’s outer perimeter to one of the rooms. Inside the room, the troops discovered five artillery shell explosives. The planned insurgent attack also included two large explosive-filled propane tanks buried under the school’s floor and numerous projectiles planted under electrical conduits in front of each classroom.

“This was a major setback,” said Army 1st Lt. Erik Peterson, a civil-military affairs officer assigned to the 25th Infantry Division’s Company A, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment. “If they went off, not only would the building have been destroyed, many lives would have been lost.”

More damage was caused by removing the explosives, Peterson said. Engineer crews had to pull up the floor and take down walls brick by brick to ensure there was no longer a threat built into the structure. Eventually, those involved in the plot were captured or killed by U.S. and Iraqi forces. “Even though this was a setback, we had to try again,” Peterson said. “This is the only secondary school in the city. If it wasn’t rebuilt, there would be no place for these girls to go to school and get a good education.”

About $300,000 of Iraqi and U.S. funds were spent to rebuild and refurbish the school, which contains 18 classrooms, science labs, an administration suite and an auditorium. Now that the school is open, it faces many of the same issues plaguing the entire education system of Iraq. “We have so many students,” Jassim said, adding that the girls now go to school in shifts to help alleviate the overcrowding. “We need more buildings so we can effectively teach these students.” Peterson said more school projects are in the works, and that he hopes more schools will open soon.

More teachers also are needed, but Jassim said he is confident that problem will be solved in the coming years. “All of the teachers we currently have graduated from this school,” he said. “They belong to this area. Some of these girls will do the same thing, and we will continue to prosper like we did before the fighting.” Jassim said he is sure the area is safe now. “There is nothing more to be scared of,” he said. “These girls can come to school in peace.”

Despite the peace and stability in the area, a symbol of violence still looms in the background. Clearly visible from inside the school’s compound is the brightly colored dome of the Ghalani Mosque. This mosque is a known safe haven for terror and frequently broadcasts anti-coalition and Iraqi security messages. But Jassim said this will not deter his efforts and those of his teachers to give the students the education they deserve. “It is our duty to provide the best education possible,” he said. “We have been charged with that duty – and we will prevail.”

Source: CENTCOM.

Cross-posted @ Rosemary’s Thoughts. Digg! Digg!

Read Full Post »

by Staff Sgt. Jody Metzger
MND-B PAO

CAMP LIBERTY, Iraq (Jan. 6, 2008) – The prosperous rebuilding of Baghdad has reached far throughout the countryside, taking account of the health and welfare of the citizens. As security systems have been established, the focus of U.S. efforts in the area has shifted to aiding and building capacity in other needed areas, like agricultural and veterinary needs.

For nearly two decades, the agriculture infrastructure deteriorated due to Saddam Hussein’s rule. Oil became the county’s livelihood and Iraq depended on the value of its oil to be able to import the necessities such as food and clothing. The negligent response to their country’s needs further weakened the growth of agriculture and farming.

Capt. Suzanne Todd (left), pauses for a photo with Col. Lyle Jackson, a veterinary officer who serves with Multi-National Corps-Iraq, and an unidentified man at a poultry farm in Arbil in northern Iraq in October. Todd’s primary mission is to track veterinary and agriculture issues of the Iraqi people.

Capt. Suzanne Todd (left), pauses for a photo with Col. Lyle Jackson, a veterinary officer who serves with Multi-National Corps-Iraq, and an unidentified man at a poultry farm in Arbil in northern Iraq in October. Todd’s primary mission is to track veterinary and agriculture issues of the Iraqi people.

Recognizing this strain on the Iraqi economy and populace, the 4th Infantry Division, Multi-National Division – Baghdad, has taken special consideration of Iraq’s lack of resources by appointing Capt. Suzanne Todd, a native of Jacksonville, Fla., who serves with 425th Civil Affairs Battalion, attached to 4th Inf. Div., MND-B, as the division’s agriculture and veterinary advisor.

Well-suited for the position, Todd has degrees in international relations as well as agriculture and veterinary medicine. She acquired a bachelor’s degree in international relations from William and Mary University in Virginia. While completing her degree, Todd joined the Reserve Officers Training Corps in 1992 at the age of 21. She became a second lieutenant as a signal corps officer in the reserves after graduating.

After spending time in the reserves, Todd decided that she wanted to go to veterinarian school with the funding help of the military. Following graduation from Michigan State with a veterinary medicine degree, Todd joined the ranks of the Army as a veterinary officer.

Although Todd has achieved a stellar education, which could provide her with a good civilian career, she always felt the need to be in the Army. “I have always wanted to be in the military. It’s kind of what I always wanted to do when I graduated, but at the time they were downsizing the active duty military, so I joined the reserves,” said Todd.

The influence to join the Army came from Todd’s mother and father who also served their country in the Army. Though they didn’t actively push for their daughter to join, they were very supportive of her decision. “My mother was an Army nurse and father was in the medical field. They had both had good experiences.”

Todd’s interests in agriculture and animals and her tenacity to follow her heart have paid off. As an adviser for MND-B, she now looks at her career field as a way to helping educate local Iraqi farmers on more advanced techniques. Her co-workers revere her hard work ethic and her expertise.

“She is a great interest to our Team,” said Lt. Col. Arnold Csan, chief of the Civil Affairs Planning Team, 4th Inf. Div., MND-B. “Since she has been here, she has gone out on missions to the vocational college and the vaccine center, both of which serve countrywide. Her focus as an agriculture expert for MND-B has been behind the largest employment of young men in Iraq.”

MND-B has marshaled a contingent of solutions and support for Iraq’s progress toward normalcy. Todd has consulted with Iraqi farmers and veterinary hospital clinics and instituted a plan to redevelop the farming infrastructure.

“One of the things they have problems with is the salinity in the soil because their traditional method of irrigation is flood irrigation. They open up the flood gates of their irrigation canals and they flood their fields with water. If there is a high salinity or salt content in the soil, which there is, that ends up in the water.”

There is a way to reclaim the land, she explained, but it takes a while to leach that salinity out of the soil. The water comes in the same way, but they have to treat it before they use it on their fields.

Since arriving in Baghdad, Todd has advised and introduced new methods of irrigation to the struggling farmers of the area such as drip and spray irrigation, along with pioneering the idea of employing a new variety of high-yield seeds.

Along with her work with the farmers and their irrigation and crop-growing needs, Todd has also done extensive work relating to the farm animals, which are equally important to the welfare and sustenance of the Iraqi people.

“If you consider agriculture, it also goes along with animal agriculture. The animals that we raise to be our food – that’s where veterinarian medicine plays a role. We as veterinarians are concerned not only about the health of livestock we grow for food but how their health impacts our health. The diseases that the animals get can impact what diseases we get – [that’s] the public health aspect.”

The mission Todd performs so effectively and passionately is yet another piece in the overall mission of the Ironhorse Division and MND-B and her work in building capacity among Iraqi farmers and farm animal producers ultimately affects the overall health of the people in and around Baghdad and their quality of life.

Source: CENTCOM.

Cross-posted @ Rosemary’s Thoughts. Digg! Digg!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »